5 Common Myths of Kettlebell Training

5 Myths About Kettlebell Training

The blessing and burden in this era of information is knowledge over wisdom, quantity over quality, and fiction over fact. The subject of kettlebell training is no different.

Kettlebell Myth #1: Kettlebells will Hurt Your Back


Kettlebell training is one of the best exercise

Kettlebell training is one of the best exercises you can do for pre- and post-rehabilitative support.

Kettlebell training’s posterior chain focus provides multi-joint muscle recruitment, muscular conditioning, and time-under-tension training… just to name a few of the many benefits.

Kettlebell Myth #2: Kettlebells are Just for Cardio


Kettlebell training is one of the best exercises you can do for pre- and post-rehabilitative support

Yes, kettlebells are an excellent tool for cardiovascular conditioning; however, that is not their primary focus. The overall benefit is total muscular endurance.

The constant recruitment in a multi-joint compound exercise like kettlebell training provides is significant in areas including connective tissue health, symmetrical muscular development, and overall functional movement health.

Kettlebell Myth #3: Kettlebells are Just for Swinging


kettlebell training provides is significant in areas including connective tissue

The most commonly performed “highlight reel” kettlebell movement is the Russian and/or American Swing.

The “behind the scenes” of kettlebell training also includes cleans, squats, presses, the illustrious kettlbell snatch, and many more exercises.

Kettlebell Myth #4: You Can’t Build Learn Muscle


Load, time under tension, muscle recruitment, duration, and more, are all elements in the creation of lean muscle.

Kettlebell training is no different.

Control the performed repetitions, the load used, time under tension, and eat accordingly and you will produce the desired results.

Kettlebell Myth #5: Swings are for Shoulders


Kettlebell Swings are not a shoulder exercise.

Kettlebell Swings are NOT a shoulder exercise.

The swing is a hip-hinging, momentum-based movement, recruiting the entire posterior chain for power, endurance, and overall strength. You can build boulder shoulders using kettlebell cleans, presses, long cycle training, Turkish Get Ups and more.

Kettlebell training offers a unique combined benefit: multi-joint compound muscle recruitment, cardiovascular conditioning, muscular conditioning, and overall strength development. Your consistent performance, focused nutrition, and proper recovery, combined with a quality training program will produce every day health and fitness that includes your “show-muscles” and “GO-muscles.”

This fit-Dad of five loves the opportunity for specific, efficient, and effective training so that I can be ready in all areas of life.


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TJ Houske

I am a believer that health begins with choice. Further, choice begins with mindset and mindset begins with thought-life. I know, “deep right?” and here you thought we were going to flex some abs, show some skin, and swing a kettlebell... don’t worry we’ve got that too. However, it is of the greatest importance that we establish THE fundamental differ- ence in our approach to coaching you on the greatest journey of life - your best-self. WEBSITE

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